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the city is shrinking and broke. to solve its financial crisis detroit will have to cut city workers pensions. illinois just pass emergency legislation to tackle $100 billion shortfall in its pension obligations. that's huge money and people will pay the price. on this edition of inside story we'll look at the trade-offs and solutions when balance sheets teeter to the brink of disaster, and we start in detroit. >> let me just say that the judge has spoken, and i do think it's a tough day for all of us here in detroit [♪ music ] >> once the nation's fourth largest city, the heart of the auto industry and the soul of american music today's detroit is a portrait of urban decay and facing a water shed moment. it is the largest municipality in u.s. history to file for bankruptcy. a federal judge ruled the city is not only insolvent but in a decisive verdict declared that pensions will be included on the chopping block. dave bing is the outgoing mayor. >> the only way we stayed alive, quite frankly, is through cuts. we cut everything that we could. unless there is more investment coming
-food workers will walk off the job on thursday. more than 100 cities are expected to take part. >> they want pay to rise to $15 an hour. >> police in mexico have recovered a stolen truck carries dangerous radio active material. in the back was cobalt-60 used in radiation treatment. no arrests have been made, but anyone who touches it could be exposed to radiation levels. >> for students at the university of california, santa barba have been afflicted with meningitis. they have recovered. they may be able to use a vaccine not yet approved in the u.s. those are the headlines. i'm thomas drayton in new york. wells trapped this >> on "america tonight," in the world's richest nation, why is it so hard for so many to make a decent living? we will look at wealth, poverty and why a minimum wage just isn't enough. >> gas is up. hiring is up but our wages aren't up. >> south of the border, the mexican city fighting off drug and gang violence to give its young people a brighter future. >>> and beckham and the boys, the story behind manu and the class of '92. kiesh >>> good evening. thanks for joining u
. hiring is up but our wages aren't up. >> south of the border, the mexican city fighting off drug and gang violence to give its young people a brighter future. >>> and beckham and the boys, the story behind manu and the class of '92. kiesh >>> good evening. thanks for joining us. i am joie chen. we begin looking at struggles of cities and workers and the future of both. money, how cities balance their economic needs and can protect their citizens. case in point, a fight for a living wage which has quietly quietly grown from a city by city movement putting more pressure on lawmakers in washington, d.c. we begin with a look in the call for a higher minimum wage. >> it was just over a year ago, when fast food employees gathered to protest low wages. the fervor caught off and has spread to about 100 cities this thursday. their demand: an increase in pay to $15 an hour, what they call a living wage. amid growing attention to low wages, president obama addressed the nation with a renewed focus on income inequality. >> we know there are airport workers and fast food workers and nurse assistants
half hour on twitter @aj real money. today the city of detroit got the go ahead from a federal judge to shed billions of dollars in debt in the largest bankruptcy in u.s. history. the national implications are huge because it sets the stages for financially strapped cities and states all across american to follow the same path and cut the money promised to unions, pension funds and retirees. in illinois, they ray proved the overall of the pension system and puerto rico deals with public debt as well. but nowhere are the debt woes as dire as in detroit. $18 billion in debt, and estimates $0.40 of every dollar collected are used to pay it off. that zaps funding for basic services and it could rise to $0.65 if $0.65 of every dollar if relief does not come soon. today's ruling allows the city to go ahead with bankruptcy proceedings, the presiding judge said that the city would not have a you blank check. unions are not so sure. what's the latest from where you are. >> reporter: well, david, he immediately the city's emergency manager kevin orr is going to start working on a plan of adjus
pleases we remain very concerned about the need to add jut the city's debt. >> detroit gets the go ahead to file for bankruptcy. the white house prepares to hard sell the affordable care act, again, and the family of allen gross fights to bring him home for cuba. detroit has officially become the largest city in u.s. history to enter bankruptcy. a federal judge has ruled that the motor city is eligible for protection under chapter nine of the bankruptcy code. the decision clears the way for the city to deal with billions of dollars in debt. but it will also have far reaching implications for its kress tors and pensioners. i have been in touch with legal experts that they thought this was is jut come, and they were right. now there is a goaling that we know where the city of detroit stands now let's move forward. and that was the point that they made during the press conference shortly after the judges ruling. we have a lot of work ahead of us, i would ask our creditors none of which filed objection to our eligibility, but equally our labor partners top to come forward with us and take th
al at the time of the theft. a controversial new plan to create a new city in louisiana is raising questions ... about race and class. the racial makeup of the new city would be dramitcally different with residents being mostly white and affluent. last week, supporters of the plan announced that they collected more than half of the signatures needed ... to let voters decide if they can go forward with the municipal plan. al jazeera's ben lemoine has more. >> jeffrey lee doesn't miss a moment with his grandchildren on the north end of baton rouge. and although they're not in school yet, he knows their education will be the key to a better life. i want them to go to a good school and learn as much as they can. >> but that's a challenge in this city where 60% of public school children aren't learning at grade level. >> it's one of the worst school systems in the state. 01:29:28 how many more generations of children do you have to disserve before you have to say let's try something different. >> lionel rainey is part of a group who claim they're pushing for a "different" plan for bette
are following this hour: the motor city is bankrupt. detroit once the nation's fourth largest city can begin to shed its $20 billion debt. it could mean cutting the pensions of thousands of retired city workers. >> the engineer in control of the train was nodding off shortly before the train lost control in new york. the federal agencies investigating the crash removed the rail union from the investigation saying there was a breach in confidentiality. >> vice president joe biden is on a week-long trip to asia to ease tensions. the plane arrived in china and plans to bring up the island controversy in beijing. while in japan he voiced support. >> the president is defending the health care website. t the white house will campaign for the site. the deadline is 23rd december to register register: you can get the latest online with aljazeera.com. need manpower. also tonight. lessons learned? the latest read on how u.s. students stack up and what it really says about american i hadcation. hadcation -- education. >> and fashion build. what role you play in one of the world's most polluted places. w
has officially become the largest city in the u.s. to go bankrupt. a federal judge cleared the way for officials to deal with $20 billion in debt. pensions of city workers and retirees could be on the chopping block. that possibility sparks protests. >>> federal investigators say it's too soon to say what caused the derailment in new york. a union official said the engineer was nodding off before the train lost control at 89 miles per hour. four people died, 60 were injured in the crash. vice president joe biden has arrived in beijing. he's meeting with leaders with the territorial dispute in japan. the fighting is heating up. tokyo on tuesday, joe biden emphasised u.s. support for japan. >> there are more protesters in the capital of kiev ukraine. demonstrators are demanding that the government step down. they are angry at the president rejecting closer ties. sneeze are the headlines. "america tonight" is up next. you can always get the latest news on aljazeera.com. see you back here tomorrow night. need manpower. also tonight. lessons learned? the latest read on how u.s. students
for a national strike. >>> tonight, crews are working to clear the scene of a train crash in new york city that de-railed on its way to manhattan. at least four people are dead, 63 more hurt of those, at least 11 are in critical condition tonight. al jazeera kimberly dukehardt has the latest from the bronx. >> fire fighters, police and the ntsb could not working through the night, checking the tracks, the actual train cars, mechanical equipment, communication equipment, to try to figure out what went horrible wrong. the holiday weekend ended in tragedy and chaos for those on board this suburban commuter train in northern new york city. the crash happened early sunday morning. >> incidentally, we have reco recovered the event recorder and downloaded the data off of the locomotive. we haven't had a chance to analyze it or verify it at this point. >> officials say the train was carrying about 150 passengers and heading to new york's granted central terminal. >> there was screaming and people trying out to god and asking for their families. it was pretty gruesome. >> it de-railed on a curved s
to last their ship are striking. in 100 cities they are striking, demanding pay. today's strikes are the latest move in a campaign that started last summer. the medium wage is slightly more than $900. >> the workers live in poverty, working in conditions. >> more than two and a quarter americans have non-management jobs with the top 10 fast food chains. anti-government forces, and the post soviet leaders issued solidarity. one is viktor yushenko, coming to power after the orange revolution in 2004. >> the protest scores have persisted for weeks. barnaby phillips reports from kiev. foreign ministers from across europe have come to kiev. this was a scheduled meeting of the osce. it's not in relation to the political crisis specifically, but you can imagine at that meeting ukraine is bound to feature and there'll be different preaches. for example, the general j the polish and the swedish for instances have been outspoken critic much russia's policy towards ukraine. but sergei lavrov, the russian foreign minister is here, and yesterday he condemned what he called n.a.t.o. inference
. lebanon's army sets up check points across the northern part of triply. a city on its knees, the city is eligible for bankruptcy. london with all the news from europe, including ukraine's prime minister with those talks the demonstrations continue. and from the ballet to being behind bars, the dancer jailed for an acid attack. french scientists have found more than ten times the level in his chest bone, but say he wasn't poisoned. al jazeera has been briefed on their study into samples taken from arafat's exhumed body, and they conclude he died from a hemorrhage in his brain. clayton swisher has the latest from pace. >> here in paris, nearly a year after yasir arafat's body was resumed, they have made available to mrs. arafat and the legal team, the results of their own report into the skeleton remains. ard cooing to the report, people who have seen it, the french are saying that arafat had brain hemorrhage and digestive infection that caused his death, they say that they are not able to affirm that chromium called his death. that of course, is at odds with what swiss scientists said
they will. i agree with them. i think they will actually be doing some growth. there will be certain cities where there will be cut backs over time but it looks like part of the settlement includes in three to five year window where they can't cut back in certain hubs they would like to, but that's part of the settlement as well. >> douglas kidd what about the flying public? what is their interest here? >> the flying public has one interest, and that is being able to fly, and of course flying on an airline that is not facing bankruptcy, and that is hopefully making money and will be in a position to treat the customer and the passenger gregory. when an airline is facing financial difficulty, there is a tendency to pinch pennies. it's quite another when american airlines in the past has received proposed fines and penalties for neglecting maintenance. that's really important. so to the extent that this merger can resolve some of those issues so that flying will remain safe and comfortable, then of course the passengers are all for it. >> the general trajectory, if you want to fly anywhere fr
of high-end retail in one of this city's wealthiest districts. what we found today is a lot of people who work in this very wealthy neighborhood, as you might expect, live in a very different world. >> alan joining us from south africa. thank you very much. >>> france said it will start disarming fighters in central african republic. they're voting to send troops to the country to restore stability, today we're hearing about the arrest of a senior rebel commander. >> reporter: if we're hearing from eyewitnesses here in the city that a leader has been arrested by the french, he is a top seleka commander very close to the president here. he was viewed as someone who might take over in it came down to it. he is feared by many in the city. he was interior minister at one point. there is even speculation that he ran a secret prison in the city, and with arrests of those who were loyal to the former president. so big news, and it may potentially have an impact on french operations here at the moment. which they're carrying out, disarming people in the streets of this city basically stopping all
one have stagnated. cities, states, and counties are taking it on themselves to bring their workers to income levels closer to the fiscal realities of these tough times. and it's no easy task. as much debate surrounds the effectiveness of image wage hikes and who really benefits. do these wage controls cost jobs? we'll discuss the issue on this addition of "inside story." but first this background. >> they deserve to live a good life in one of the richest cities in the world. >> reporter: close to 100 people rallied outside washington, d.c. city council chamber as council members inside voted to raise the city's minimum wage to $11.50 an hour. >> congress' failure to act, and congress' failure to take care of those left behind not just from the recession, but as the people who make the most have done better and better, we've become a city of haves and have nots, and a country of haves and have nots. step up and make sure that people have a living wage. >> reporter: with little hope congress will raise the minimum wage t wage. in september california governor jerry brown approved a g
saying essentially the came thing. they were able to get in very high profile areas in the city, but he said the fight is not over. and in some respect it will kick back in again after the king's birthday on thursday. >>> reports from north korea suggests that the leader has sacked an important power broker. gerald tan reports that it has government officials in south korea wondering how this could effect the future leadership. i'm sorry, we seem to have loss that report, we'll get back to it as soon as we can -- time now to cross to london for the news from europe. let's join lauren taylor. >>> thank you very much. starting with events in ukraine where the opposition has tried but failed to force a vote of no confidence. but the prime minister has apologized by some of the violence by riot police. demonstrators keep up the pressure on the government. our correspondent is in independence square. rory over to you. >> reporter: in the end, lauren, it wasn't even very close, the opposition are a minority in the european parliament. they needed to push through a boundary of 225 votes to get
lake city and kansas city prepare for the mls cup. and in this league the match was a family battle. the entire league is a single business entity. >> we created the structure that allows us at a very high level to think of things that will help the game grow, and to try to avoid. >> it handles tale teams and it proves that it's working. >> i don't think you can find another soccer team in the world that can say the same thing. i believe we have one of the most competitive soccer leagues in the world. >> they're disciplined and organized and careful about how they spend money. the major league soccer has a salary cap of $3 million. >> it can't touch the pay of the three big sports. the nfl salary cap is $123 million. pro basketball, $59 million. that's per team. the entire mls league wide payroll, $89 million according to the league office with each team allowed to over pay key players. >> the reality is that money talks. and players are, you know, are working towards their livelihood. they have limited careers they want to make as much money as possible and no one can fault them fo
a business in a bankrupt city. detroit opens its very first distillery in 100 years. ♪ good morning and welcome to al jazeera america, i'm morgan live from new york. this morning 26,000 commuters in new york city suburbs have to find another way to get to work. this after a train derailed yesterday just outside of manhattan. the accident left four dead and dozens injured and ntsb investigators have now recovered the train's data recorder and trying to determine exactly what caused the crash. >> our mission is to understand not just what happened but why it happened with the intent of preventing it from happening again. >> reporter: the train jumped the tracks just as it was getting ready to leave the bronx and cross into manhattan and 7 cars derailed with the lead car feet away from the hudson river. it happened along a curved section of the track and trying to figure out the excessive speed played a role. an al jazeera's john is here live from the bronx, john? >> morgan good morning. the hudson line of metro north railroad is one of the busiest commuter rail routes in the world. 2
liabilities detroit's bankruptcy plan, the ruling allowing the city to cut retiree pensions. >> joe biden's trying to find a diplomatic solution over disputes between china and japan. >> he's alive. >> what started as a recovery mission becomes a stunning rescue. the sole survivor of a capsize at sea stuck from days on the bottom of the atlantic. >>> a good morning and welcome to al jazeera america. it's good to have you with us. i'm drait. in a major development. the engineer of the train apparently admitted to a nunion representative that he nodded off at the controls. it happened while the train travelled at 82 miles per hour. the ntsp removed the commoout ear rail employees union, citing a breach of confidentiality when they talked to the media. >> al jazeera correspondent has the latest on the investigation. >> for the first time since the metro north train derailment leaving four dead and dozens injured attention is shifting from mechanical failure, focussing on the train's engineer. >> based on this data, there's no indication that the brake systems were not functions properly. >>
been. a monumentel ruling for the motor city, a judge decides if detroit can file for bankruptcy today. resignation rejected, thailand's prime minister refuses to step down as antigovernment protesters storm her office building. and protection from poachers, how the illegal ivory trade is threatening elephants. ♪ 82 miles per hour, that is how fast federal investigators say a commuter train was traveling before i derailed sunday outside new york city. the train was heading into a dangerous curve and should have been going 30 miles per hour. good morning and welcome to al jazeera america, it's good to have you with us, i'm thomas. crews used heavy equipment to clear the crash scene and turned the derailed cars upright and put them back on the tracks. al jazeera erica has the latest on the investigation and good morning. >> investigators say over the next few days the rail cars and train will be moves to a secure location for a more detailed examination. at this point they have not determined if the train wreck which killed four people and injured 60 others was the result of facility b
arafat's death as the french rule out poisons as the cause. a historic day in detroit, as the motor city becomes the largest municipality ever to enter bankruptcy. the decision clears the way for detroit to shed $18 billion in debt, but not without hurting residents, creditors and pensioners. she is in detroit, bc, what's been the reaction to this decision, a lot of people obviously impacted by this? >> yes, i can tell you that reaction for the most part has been micked. on one hand, you have these retireees who they know for the most part they were dreading this day, and they heard what they didn't want to hear. they were hearing that their pension could be reduced and on the other hand, i am hear alsoing from people who say okay, we realize we recognize and now it is confirmed that the city has a huge financial problem on its hands so maybe we can use this bankruptcy as an opportunity to start over. >> that's the big fear. our mentions may go on the chopping block, our water department may be sold off, and this is the fear. >> for me personally, and for most of the people in detroit. a
an american teacher. it happened while the man was out runnin running in e eastern city. the imagine cut chemistry, no one has claimed responsible for the attack. six people are dead and several others wounded. was attacked on wednesday, suicide bombers and armed fighters attacked the compound. the gun battle with police, no group has said that it carried out the attack. >> now there are more syrians living in the jordanian province than jordanians. the influx is worrying resident that is say the refugee crieses is maiming them poorer and frustrated. >> the government says this is causing infrastructure to crumble, and that's significant funds are required to meet additional demand for services like water, sanitation, and electricity. >> the u.n. refugee agency and its partners are trying to mitigate the impact of the refugee crisis by funding clean up campaigns to improve sanitation here. an old bakery has been renovated with new equipment, to triple bread production and kate tore a larger population. they appreciate the help, but say jordanians need more support. >> all of these aid ag
... >>> this is al-jazeera america, live from new york city. i am tony harris with a look at today's top stories. >> it tells us what happened. it doesn't tell us why it happened. >> what happened is that the train that de-railed and killed four people in new york was going faster than it was supposed to. but figuring out why could take months. after two months offications, the federal government healthcare web sight appears to be working better but it's not working completely. that could mean more trouble. violent protests pit rich against pour. now, opposition leader threatening to overthrow thailand's government. >> 82 miles per hour. >> that's how fast federal investigators say a commuter train was going when it de-railed on sunday. four people died when the metro-north train jumped the tracks on, on a curve, dozens more were hurt. investigators now know how fast the train was going. they still don't know for sure why it de-railed. let's take you to jonathan martin. he is at the crash site in the bronx. jonathan? >> reporter: hey, tony. you know, investigators have said from t
be special prayer position set up in different cities around the country where people can go, leave memories, sign letters to nelson mandela and demonstrate their interest at remembering this man at various places around the country. it's going to be a very, very busy and historic week. >> allen we'll be checking with you soon. thank you so much. >>> and in los angeles many are paying their respects to nelson mandela as well. he visited the city after his release to prison in 1990. brian rooney is in los angeles and joins us from the first earchafrican methodist church. tell us more about that, and about any special services happening there today. >> he actually came here, only a few months after his release from prison, in june of 1990. and nelson mandela was always kind of a focus. this was one of the leading churches in all of los angeles. a real community center. and they always held a candle for nelson mandela during the american years of civil rights struggle, and in those years when he was in prison they felt a connection to him which was completed when he actually came here in 1990.
of a city block. >> there were multiple gunshots fired. >> it can track a gunman thousands of miles away. >> if you can track it then you can predict it. >>> severe winter storms are causing power outages and caused so much trouble with traffic across the country. temperatures in north dakota plunged to 20 degrees below zero over the weekend. winter weather advisories are in effect from vermont to virginia as the system moves east. we have more on all of this weather across the country. jaleel la. >> the conditions across washington, d.c. to new york city are alley deteriorating. look at the traffic cam right now. the roadways empty. they should be empty. look at that snow piled up on the roadways. that's the scene in washington, d.c. very different scene in new york city. cloudy skies for sure. don't worry, the snow and the sleet is on the way, and temperatures are going to plummet as we track on into the evening hours. take a look at the map here behind me. as a matter of fact, this is i-70 just east of i-270 right outside of frederick, maryland. the roads are looking horrible right no
on this situation. >> in the city center, it does feel like a revolution is underway. the city hall has become a headquarters for protesters. all day, people came in. just have a look or enjoy the food and hot drinks or even to catch a nap. amidst all of this, a workman valiantly removes the carpet so that it won't get damaged in these extraordinary times. the problem for the opposition is: where do they go from here? how do they turn occupation into political victory? >> the way to resolve this crisis is through presidential and parliamentary elections. we have a resolution in the government of ukraine. this government should resign. >> pictures have emerged from sunday night that show the police were, at times, brutal in their treatment of protesters and journalists. anton is a photographer, beaten by riot police. he pleaded with them to stop. these are his bruises. this is all that's left of his camera. the police were also on the receiving end. officials say 35 were hurt by protesters. some are in hospital. away from the city center, there are no protests, just the grim routine of life in
to raise the minimum wage. a lot of talk about that here in d.c. where the city council is voting to raise the minimum wage. democrats are now worried about heading into the midterm election, and with the senate up for grabs, so the president is going there, speaking to a liberal think tank, the center for american progress who is sponsoring the talk. he is bolstering his base, renewing some of his themes he has been talking about and setting his agenda not only for the state of the union speech coming up presumably last month, but also for the last three years of his presidency, stephanie. >> all right. we'll check back with you later >>> the president and other senior officials will take part in a youth summit at the white house. dozens of young people will gather to discuss the affordable care act, the economy and other important issues. >>> congress has a lot to get done before the end of the year, but it's not clear if the work will be finished since lawmakers don't plan to spend a lot of time in washington. libby casey good morning. what are the pressing items, and how much hope that
being honored in cities large and small 1234 absolutely, del, and people here and in nelson mandela square in the rain at 7:00 in south africa, a soggy evening, but it doesn't seem to offend the crowds much. they have been coming here constantly to the many tribute centers set up around the country for nelson mandela. now this is a very ritzy mall. this is really the heart of high-end retail in the city of johannesburg, and it is in one of the richest districts in this country. as we found out today many of the people who work in this neighborhood, as you might expect live in a very different world. mandela square mall, some of the richest retail in south africa. and a short few blocks away a different story. part of the crowd of sidewalk vendors on mod street. they sell what they make seven days a week. on a good day they might make $45. on a bad day less than $300. 3--less than $3, and some days nothing. they live and create their pieces recycling street trash into instant art. they rent in single room at just $100 a month. they're keenly aware of how money flows here. >> when you
with this plan. >> elsewhere, an american teacher has been shot dead in libya. it happened in the eastern city of benghazi. gunman shot the man who works at an international school. no one has claimed responsibility for that attack. u.s. secretary of state has presented ideas on improving israeli security as part of the deal between israelis and palestinians. >> i believe we are making some progress. the parties remain committed to this task. they are meeting regularly and we have remind in very close touch with both leaders. once again, israel's security is fundamental to these negotiations. >> john kerry is in meetings today. we are in ramallah right now. >> they don't share the optimism that you might have gotten in the meeting between mr. kerry and mr. netanyahu. the palestinian negotiators say the process has ground to a halt and hope mr. kerry can get them out of what they're calling a crisis. the israelis say they are creating crisis. the palestinians say the israelis are not serious when it comes to talks. it is not clear if there have been any meaningful talks. they point to the conti
from different locations on the city on descending on government house, that is the main target of the protest and wayne reports now on their progress. >> reporter: the leader of the antigovernment movement called for one more show of strength to topple the governmentments. protesters are on long journey to cross the thai capitol bangkok and call it the final battle and say the objective was cle clear. the protest started a month ago with the stated aim of returning power to the people and as they began the long march the prime minister made a concession. >> translator: brothers and sisters of thailand, i'm yingluck shinawatra the prime minister of thailand and i would like to notify everyone after listening to opinions on all sides i decided to request a royal decree to resolve parliament this year. >> reporter: the goals of the protesters have changed and as they arrived at the office of the prime minister it became clear that a new election wasn't enough. >> translator: dissolving parliament doesn't matter and we have come here because we want to restore the monarchy and
cancer medication. is this really saving money? the growing trend to try and eliminate state and city workers in an effort to save the state money. they turn these over to the private health care companies, are they saving money? yes, there is a cost savings, but when you start throwing in lawsuits, cost taxpayers more than a million dollars, those lawsuits can start to really add up. >> since we've gone to privatization weren't there always problems with health care? >> there were problems, problems that were documented. there are problems with prison health care now. prison health care has been a long ongoing issue in this country but the statistics are quite certain. when you look at what happened there, particularly in arizona, the number of deaths since privatization have gone way up. also the number of suicides have gone way up. that's because these private companies are cutting back for services for mental health. >> i think there are a lot of people who with all due respect will say, these people have been put in prison for a reason. how much does the system actually owe them?
to come out to watch what is going on. but there are still tens of thousands of those in the city who are preferring to stay under forces at the airport. >> a suicide-bomber drove a car explosive into the main gates and building. the ministry complex has been targeted because u.s. drones were being operated from there. >>> seven filipinos killed in an attack. they were working the hospital at military headquarters. 10 million filipinos work overseas. >>> we have more from kiev and anti-government protests. >> reporter: there has been a headline set for demonstrators in kiev to take city hall. let's take you live to kiev. >> reporter: in the last few minutes we heard from the opposition meeting behind me at the trade union house, which they've been using as protest headquarters throughout the demonstration. their initial reaction is how can we negotiate and hold talks when we are surrounded by riot police. that's their message to the government. now they have not ruled out completely the idea of talks. they have been willing to negotiate, and that is the removal of president yanukovych
>> this is al jazeera america. live from new york city i'm tony harris with a look at today's top stories. scores of world leaders travel osearchto south africa for the l this week. snow and high winds as the u.s. finds itself in a deep chill. world leaders from nearly 100 nations are making their way to south africa to honor one man: nelson mandela. among those already in south africa former u.s. president jimmy carter who is in johannesburg. kofe annan. and the former president of ireland is there. dozens of others are en route. president obama and the first lady left for south africa, board air force 1 joined by george bush and his wife. are ali velshi is leading our team in johannesburg. ali, set the scene for us literally hours before the event tomorrow in johannesburg. >> well it's gone cold, tony, it's raining tonight in johannesburg. it was a clear day. police were setting up barricades and rerouting. you could see dignitaries coming in and police convoys. as you said jimmy carter is here as well. george w. bush, bill clinton will be here, world leaders from all over the p
years they feel they're doing pretty well compared to many in this city. not far away inside of the commercial high rises of sandton is alexandria township where persistent groining grinding poferlt shapes lives. the remains of his house bears his prisoner number from decades of incarceration. earning $2 a day or less, the unemployment rate is about 25% and most of those unemployed are young. alfie and claudia say they are not disappointed but the government -- >> i wish to have more. when none of this is done you get another face and make your future bright. >> so things aren't too bad but they wouldn't mind if thinks were just a little bit better. the people with the money had have the money. they don't think much of that money is flowing downhill into alexandria and the bez valley. >> al jazeera america will provide further coverage of the memorial. i will be back early, covering the service, our coverage begins at 4:00 a.m. eastern, 1:00 pacific. >>> fighting in central african republic began last month, there won't be any u.s. troops on the ground. defense secretary chuc
fast food workers are striking in more than 100 cities. they are demanding an increase in the minimum wage, and pushing to make it easier to unionize. many are asking for $15 an hour. that's nearly twice as much as the average worker earned. raising the minimum wage will not hurt jobs. fast food chains already have a wage increase would drive up the prices. that is by far the hirest in the country. tonya mosley is in washington state with more on how families struggle to get by on low pay. >> it's 22:00, and maya molina's five hour shift at kfc is over. she is off to pick up her youngest son to day care before heading home. and with no time to take off her uniform, maya heads to the kitchen to make a snack and help her two older children with home work. >> they look to me, they don't have no one else to look to. >> for the last five years the 35-year-old single mother of three has been making $9.31 an hour. that's just under $17,000 a year. >> i'm the definition of the working poor as they say. >> maya's job helps, but doesn't cover the cost of supporting a family of four. at 35 hours
violent cities in america to see how technology can help us fight crime? >> that's right. i went to oakland, california which has the 5th highest crime rate and nearby richmond which is among the top 20 to look at some very innovative technology that they are looking to increase the eyes and ears of the police force on the street. so let's have a look these are streets. >> i am not violating any law. >> in two san francisco bay area cities known for crime oakland and rimmond westbound. >> but now, police in both of these cities have high tech back-ups. electronic ears listening for gunfire, 24/7. he lectronic eyes monitoring police and perps alike. even the cars on this street. officer chris tong is patrolling the streets of richmond that. ding you hear is the sound of a license plate reader. watch what happens when he passes a stolen vehicle. >> it's just triggered on an unoccupied vehicle. turn around and take a look what we've got here. >> the unoccupied vehicle was a stolen nissan sentra caught by the high-speed infrared camera, a series of computer algorithims identified the
[ music ] >>> this is al-jazeera america live from new york city. i am tony harris. we will look at today's top stories. investigators turn their focus to the data recorders pulled from the wreckage of a deadly train derailment in new york. the white house says healthcare.gov is running smoother than ever. insurance companies say it is far from fixed. protesters in thailand clash with police as the prime minister refuses calls to step down. >>> amazon says it wants to change what we know about doorstep delivery. ♪ >>> a if he hfederal investigat they will soon know the cause of sunday's deadly train derailment in new york city. the ntsb is now processing information from the train's black boxes. officials say at least 63 people were hurt and four people were killed when the train derailed as it rounded a curve. crews are still at the scene up right in toppled cars, trying to restore full service on one of the nation's busiest commuter rail line. jonathan martin joins us from the crash site. and jonathan, i believe we are standing by to get an update on the investigation soon >>
it can take you right into a city, it solves that last mile problem that you have with planes and ships. a train, though, because it can arrive in a city there is rail passing right through metropolitan centers including baltimore, the mentioned the fire there. chicago had 13 derailments alone in 2012. you have washington, d.c. where a big and very dangerous chemicals can pass within a mile of the white house. the gulf coast is where most of the nation's chlorine is produced and moved. in las vegas within half a mile are 95,000 people, and there is a train that goes right through there that occasionally carries radioactive waste. >> thank you. now the government said it's healthcare winds is up and running for most people. thousands of customers are testing the system. the affordable care act wins has been plagued by problems since it's october is launch. people looking for insurance coverage only have three weeks to sign up. mike viqueira joins us from the white house with more. how is the website doing today? >> they say they have a lot of problems fixed, and you're right, john, it's
>> this is al jazeera america, live from new york city. i'm sunny sunny. 911 tapes display calmness at the sandy hook elementary school. and president obama discussed the gap between rich and poor. and this congress goes down known as the least productive. >>> a florida high school placed on high school after a shooting. one student has been injured at west orange high school outside of arsenal. the school's principal said student had been shot and was en route to the hospital. law enforcement officers were at the scene and they were observing all safety procedures. we'll bring you more information as we get it. >>> in a matter of just ten days the nation will mark the one year anniversary of the sandy hook massacre. today brought a painful remind reminder. prosecutors have released 911 called. al jazeera will not air those calls. >> reporter: we did listen to seven calls shortly after fires were shot inside sandy hook elementary school. a woman called the police dispatcher and said she had glimpsed someone running down the hall with a gun saying they were still shooting. and glass
there is more in the way of rain today and new york city with the quick burst of snow it will get washed out before another round moves in and we have a number of advisories posted and travel plans along i-95 you will encounter slick spots and give yourself plenty of time and of course make sure that you provide a little bit of extra space between you and the car ahead of you as well. across the great lakes we will see some light flakes of snow falling and as far as accumulation we will see more of that as we get in the day on tuesday, this is the timing of what we are dealing with today and through the morning and conditions will clear out and see a break in all the action and by tuesday we will be on the backside of the storm system, more moisture moves in with the cold air already if place and by tuesday morning snow moves right back into new york city and it looks like we will be in for the same conditions as we dealt with the last round and get the snow and freezing rain and plain rain before everything wraps up across the area. in the plains it's the dense fog causing problems in dalla
visited the city in 1990 after his release from prison. brian rooney is live outside that church. explain to us why that church is such a special connection to nelson mandela >> reporter: well, it's one of the most prominent churches in all of los angeles, and it is a community focus. it's always been involved. and back in the days when nelson mandela was in prison and america was going through its civil rights era, there was a special connection. people here were inspired by nelson mandela andrew strength from him. and then to have him come and visit only a few months after he got out of prison was quite a big event here they have been remembering him in church services all day. and i would like to take a listen for a minute here they just do wonderful services here ♪ ♪ amen. ♪ amen. ♪ amen. ♪ >> reporter: we have with us now one of the leaders of those services, senior pastor j. edgar boyd. thanks for being with us. >> thank you. >> i wondered: how do you, in a relatively brief service, how down memorialize this man? >> it's almost impossible to memorialize him because it is
of immigrants in the u.s. isn't anything new. but since the mi the mid 90s, after the oklahoma city bombings in 1995, congress passed laws expanding the grounds for the detention and deportation of noncitizens. for national security reasons and set up a registry for those from predominantl predominantlym countries. in 2003, the bush administration created ice, under the newly formed department of homeland security, its ten year goal was to deport every single deportable noncitizen in the country. two years later the bush administration expanded the detention of criminal prosecution of undocumented people crossing the border. >> undocumented individuals to enter our country represents an obvious homeland security act. >>> in 2006, congress passed the secure detention act, ice also promoted programs like secured communities and the criminal alien program that flagged potentially deportable immigrants. secure communities has expanded leading to a sharp rise in detentions and deportations. >> the highest number of roofnlingremovals in our histor. >> it has been another record breaking year in im
that are threatening to unseat the president. now section was kiev are out of his control. the city's police chief has been suspended after the violent tactics used to evict the protesters were here. more prominent scouts are expected. there have been round table talks between the opposition parties and the government at the initiative of the parliamentary speaker here in kiev. but the only thing that has come out of those talks is the demand for the cabinet to be dissolve. and coming from the three rings of the west of the ukraine was first to respond to the opposition's call for a nationwide strike. he runs a ski rental business with 20 employees. >> i cannot stand it. the police are under the control of yanukovych. >> reporter: the president is set to travel to china and russia in the coming days, but he'll be leaving behind him a country descending ever deeper in crisis. a crisis that president putin can do little to help him with. >> and new footage shows how violent the clashes were on sunday. the police are accused of using unnecessary violence when trying to break up the demonstration. those u
>> this is al jazeera america, live from new york city. i'm tony harris with a look at your top stories. the train that derailed in new york city was traveling at 82 mph as it approached a bend in the track. authorities are trying to find out why the train was going so fast. the crash killed four people and injured more than 60. the obama administration said it's revamped healthcare website is running for smoothly. it claims the site is 90% fixed but users are still reporting problems getting coverage or in some cases just logging on to the site. >>> pro tessers in thailand have taken over several government buildings as they try to force the country's prime minister to step down. a prominent oppositional leader has been telling followers to storm buildings. three people have died in the protest over the last several days, vice president joe biden has arrived in asia for a week-long trip. the visit is expected to be dominated by dispute over islands in the chain seas. chip niece scare defense zone over islands claimed by both countries. biden will visit china and south korea. an
. there were so many people on the street, that it got lost, it got lost makes it ways to the city hall. where they were going to give his first peach. people have been waiting so long to hear one word out of this man's mouth, and he got it on on the balcony, of city hall, and gave this rambling speech, most of which was ground out by the din on the street. i think we forget all this many years on. >> you want to interview him a couple of times. over time, did he understand the impact that he had had did he understand what his legacy would be? i think as we just heard, it was his trip to new york, which i was also lucky enough to cover, ealey made him understand. i think in those first few weeks out of jail, and seeing all these people line-up to say hello to them, they were tribal leaders, that took days to get there, with little pieces of paper with different disputes that they wanted him to resolve. i think it took him a while to realize that he had this huge reach which of course, he didn't know for much of the time that he was in jail. >> on this end, in the safe the immaterial packet thi
and they are here to reassure people and protect them and soon they'll be disarming the various groups in this city. that isn't happening yet. the rules of engagement mean the french can only shoot when they come under attack. >> translator: there are lots of people calling us directly on the phone telling us that selica forces are attacking and when we arrive there is no one there so we have to play a game of cat and mouse. >> muslims are being killed too. these men are mourning the death of a community leader. they want the french to stay but not to interfere in their political process. >> translator: has to stay and france has to help us hold elections so we can choose a president deserving of that name. and lead the country. jotadea has to stay for the transition. >> there are some people who are comparing this to rwanda in 1994. the genocide there killed hundreds of thousands of people. there are differences. that was ethnic violence. here it is sectarian. and religious leaders are preaching peace, not hate. >> translator: there's a growing atmosphere of vengeance. you can't call it geno
bankrupt. the city can work up a plan to she had billions in debt. it could include cutting bi pensions for thousands of people. appeals are expected but the city manager, kevyn orr is moving forward. >>> a crucial new clue in sunday's deadly train crash. a union official says the engineer at the control of the passenger train was nodding off shortly before the train veered off of the rails at break-neck speed. several investigators say there is no evidence of brake or rail failure >>> president obama defending his healthcare site again. he said he will come pain for it until december 23rdrd. >> that's the deadline to sign up for insurance coverage. >>> overseas, vice president joe biden is in asia trying to ease tensions between japan and china. countries are fighting over a group of islands. in tokyo today, biden said the u.s. stands with japan. those are the headlines at this ho hour. i am john siegenthaler seeing. consider th "consider this" with antone i don't mora is next. you can always get the latest news on acceljazeera.com. we will see you at 11:00 o'clock. >> can getting stit
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